Book List

6 Books with Multiple Perspectives

October 27, 2017
Nicole Fiorica
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Whenever I start a book with more than one point of view, I always know I’m in for something special. Through the eyes of more than one character, the world of the story suddenly has twice (or three or more) times the dimension, and as a reader, we are privileged with that much more information about the other characters: more feelings, secrets, and backstory that we never would have known from only perspective. Here are 6 books that make use of different points of view:

Bad Girls with Perfect Faces by Lynn Weingarten

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When Sasha’s best friend Xavier rekindles a relationship with his toxic ex, Ivy, Sasha poses online to seduce and expose Ivy for who she really is. Primarily from Sasha and Xavier’s points of view, this lightning-fast thriller will make your head spin trying to guess what happens next.

 

Strange Fire by Tommy Wallach

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Two civilizations, the cities of Anchor and Sophia, have had a different response to the apocalyptic event that destroyed the world generations before. Brothers from The Anchor travel and preach against technology of the past, only to uncover a group of rebels that want the opposite. It will take points of view from all sides to make the whole picture clear.

 

All American Boys by Jason Reynolds and Brendan Kiely

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Rashad is brutally beaten by a police officer who falsely accuses him of stealing from a convenience store. His classmate, Quinn is in the crowd of onlookers, but the cop is his best friend’s brother, and he freezes. In the days that follow, Rashad and Quinn grapple with the hard truths that are circulating their town – truths about prejudice and racism, and the alternate points of view powerfully illustrate two sides of a divided issue coming together to stand up for what’s right.

 

The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed

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Grace, Rosina, and Erin are all outcasts at their high school who come together to take a stand against the pervasive rape culture that ran a girl out of town the year before. Each is unique in their own way: Grace, the new girl, who is burning with the need to make a difference; Rosina, the queer punk girl desperate to escape the burden of her mother’s expectations; and Erin, whose obsession with marine biology is not enough to make her forget the trauma of her own past. What’s equally special about this book is that it takes the time to switch into the points of view of minor characters, some of whom are never named, but who represent a whole spectrum of girls within one small town.

 

Zero Repeat Forever by G. S. Prendergast

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Eighth is a member of the Nahx, with no voice or name, only a mission to dart Humans and protect his partner. Meanwhile, Raven is just a girl at summer camp when the Nahx invade and kill her boyfriend. Suddenly, she and Eighth are thrust together, and must put aside their differences if they want to survive. Having both Eighth and Raven’s points of view makes their growing connection feel that much stronger.

 

When Dimple Met Rishi by Sandhya Menon

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Dimple doesn’t realize that her parents have sent her to a summer program for web developers with an ulterior motive: to find a husband. Rishi, on the other hand, knows he’s being sent to the same course with the task of wooing his potential future wife. With both points of view in mind, the reader always knows what’s going on, and can fall in love with both characters at once.

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